Edition 2015

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Engineering

Engineers from New Mexico State University inspect a bridge on I-25 at Nogal Canyon, north of Las Cruces. David Jauregui, NMSU Wells Hatch Professor of Civil Engineering, is leading a research project on bridges in the state. (NMSU photo by Darrell Pehr) SEP14

(Photo by Darrell Pehr)

The Bridge Inspection Program

Dr. David Jáuregui, left, and graduate student Brice Carpenter discuss a computer model of a bridge created by Carpenter (Photo by Darren Phillips).

Dr. David Jáuregui, left, and graduate student Brice Carpenter discuss a computer model of a bridge created by Carpenter (Photo by Darren Phillips).

NMSU has been conducting bridge inspection in support of the New Mexico Department of Transportation (NMDOT) since 1989. Under the direction of David V. Jáuregui, Professor of Civil Engineering, and thanks to the expertise of NMSU engineering faculty, such as Professor Kenneth R. White, P.E., the program continues to support NMDOT by inspecting complex bridges across the state in accordance with the National Bridge Inspection Standards. In addition to helping the state of New Mexico maintain compliance with the Federal Highway Administration, the Bridge Inspection Program provides NMSU students with unique education opportunities in bridge engineering design, construction, inspection, evaluation, and maintenance. The program also accords NMSU Civil Engineering students hands-on experience in bridge inspection through six-month co-op assignments under the supervision of NMSU engineering faculty and staff.

NMSU Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Professors Mingjun Wei (left), Young Lee, and Fangjun Shu measure flow downstream turbulence generated in a diesel engine intake using particle image velocimetry system (Photo by Darren Phillips).

NMSU Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Professors Mingjun Wei (left), Young Lee, and Fangjun Shu measure flow downstream turbulence generated in a diesel engine intake using particle image velocimetry system (Photo by Darren Phillips).

Advances in Fluid Dynamics Research

Mingjun Wei preparing a flapping-wing micro-air vehicle model to be scanned by the Polytec PSV-500 scanning vibrometer (Photo by Hamid Mansouri Rad).

Mingjun Wei preparing a flapping-wing micro-air vehicle model to be scanned by the Polytec PSV-500 scanning vibrometer (Photo by Hamid Mansouri Rad).

NMSU’s College of Engineering faculty members are actively engaged in various aspects of fluid dynamics research. Recent accomplishments of three faculty members in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have significantly advanced NMSU capabilities in these areas. Since joining NMSU in 2006, Associate Professor Mingjun Wei has garnered in excess of $2 million from the Department of Defense for his research activities in numerical simulation and optimization of hummingbird-size, flapping-wing micro-air vehicles (MAV), as well as developing reduced-order models for complex fluid or fluid-solid systems. Lately, Young Lee and Fangjun Shu, assistant professors of mechanical and aerospace engineering, in collaboration with Mingjun Wei, were funded $493,567 from the Army Research Laboratory for acquisition of a Polytec PSV-500 scanning vibrometer, a LaVision time-resolved 3D PIV system, and an ATOS core essential 2MP 3D scanner to form an integrated system for laser-based, non-intrusive experimentation and data-driven reduced modeling of multidisciplinary phenomena occurring in structural and fluid dynamics.